Why Emergency Funds Matter

Based on a true story

Being open and transparent is very important to try to connect with as many people possible who are in different seasons of their journey. I was less than a year into being debt-free when I started dealing with anxiety. I thought of myself as a relatively healthy person. Diet, mindfulness, and spirituality are critical to my well being. Good health has been my thing. Then 2018 life started throwing me curveballs in the form of panic attacks. They got so bad I had to take a month off of work to understand what was going on.

Short- and long-term disability insurance programs replace some of the wages lost by people who cannot work because of a disabling injury or illness that is not work-related. Short-term disability insurance typically covers periods lasting less than 6 months, and long-term disability insurance lasts for the length of the disability or until retirement.

Bureau of Labor Statistics

A colleague advised me that I could file for short term disability, which would pay me while I was out. The insurance company declined my claim; I was astounded at their decision.

Just over 1 in 4 of today’s 20 year-olds will become disabled before they retire.
Accidents are NOT usually the culprit. Back injuries, cancer, heart disease and other illnesses cause the majority of long-term absences.
Are you prepared if it happens to you? Probably not. If you’re like most Americans, you don’t have disability insurance. Or enough emergency savings to last 34.6 months. Yes, that’s the duration of the average long-term disability claim.

Council for Disability Awareness

Several weeks into my leave I received my last paycheck and my rent, car insurance, cell phone, and cable were all due. The sad part is when you’re going through a health scare and stop working; your bills don’t stop. Debtors don’t terminate balances, they add interest! With all of the doctor’s appointments (deductibles) and fighting with Aetna, I had enough money to cover my bills. I went to the bank and withdrew my bi-weekly pay amount from my emergency savings account. They hadn’t seen me in years outside of when I set the account up. I wish I had set it up with a company with a higher savings rate. It gave so much peace of mind knowing that money was there, and readily accessible. There was no guilt, pain, or pushback. I built this fund for an occurrence of the like. Can you imagine what life would’ve been like without that cushion? Understandably people fall on hard times. Build an emergency fund, make it your top priority if you don’t have one. Everyone’s crisis may be different; some fall under car issues, medical bills, or job layoffs. Others have aging parents; my mom had a slip and fell back in December. I was on a plane the next day to see her and rented a car and covered medical expenses.

Life comes at you fast, this isn’t a scare tactic. This is my story a plea be proactive, but I’ll give you some statistics for those of you who would like the scope of each generations activity around emergency funds. According to Bankrate, “35% of millennials have more credit card debt than savings”. People are prone to finance emergencies on their credit card, adding to the debt ceiling. “41% of baby boomers and 45% of Generation X are more focused on emergency savings than paying off debt”. Point being, secure your peace of mind with an emergency saving of at least $1K and make it easily accessible. Also, practice self-control not to spend or touch it; you never know when you may need it. 

This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. That statistic about 1 out of 4 20 year olds freaks me out! Thanks for sharing, I didn’t know that.
    I will be reviewing my insurance coverages to see what they say about disability.

    1. It’d be best to review your insurance through work and personal coverages. Too often we forget about the importance of having our own coverage just in case we leave an organization.

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